Do you have questions about foot care? We have answers!

Do you have questions about foot injuries or the causes of foot pain? Dr. Stephanie Carollo provides the answers to frequently asked questions (FAQs) about foot injuries and foot care. If you would like to schedule an appointment to talk about your foot pain, call Dr. Stephanie Carollo’s office at (586) 298-1585.

Achilles Tendon Pain (1)

Q: Why does the back of my heel hurt?

A: You may have Achilles tendonitis, which an inflammation or irritation of the Achilles tendon, which is located in the back of your lower leg, and which attaches to the back of your heel bone which can cause your heel to hurt.  People with this condition often have tight calf muscles.  Some people with pain in the back of the heel can have a heel spur, or bone spur at the back of the heel bone.  For more information about Achilles tendonitis.  Also visit our heel pain page for more information.

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Ankle Sprains (1)

Q: I sprained my ankle, but it still hurts. Why is this?

A: This could be for a number of reasons.  First of all, you may actually have a fracture or broken bone, and NOT a sprain.  The only way to know that the injury you suffered was actually a sprain and NOT a fracture is to have x-rays taken.  Ankle injuries can also cause damage to ligaments, tendons, and cartilage, which are structures around the ankle joint.  Returning to activity prematurely after an injury can lead to prolonged or recurrent pain, as can repeat ankle sprains.

See our Ankle Sprain page for more information.

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Bone Spurs (1)

Q: If I have a heel spur, do I need surgery?

A: No.  A heel spur sometimes occurs with a condition called plantar fasciitis, but we know from the research that it is actually NOT the spur that is causing the pain.  The spur results from the plantar fascia structure pulling on the heel bone over time, but is sometimes even seen on the x-rays of people who have never had heel pain at any point in their life.  Similarly, people can have heel pain but not actually have a heel spur.  Treatment for heel pain is directed at the cause, which is commonly but not always plantar fasciitis.  The overwhelming majority of people with plantar fasciitis have a total resolution of their pain without any invasive procedure or surgery, as there are many excellent treatment options available for this condition.

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Bunions (4)

Q: What’s that bump near my big toe?

A:  If it’s located on the inside of the foot, it’s likely a bunion.  This occurs when the bone behind the big toe moves toward the other foot, and the big toe itself drifts toward the 2nd toe.  If the bump is located on the top of the foot, it could represent a bone spur, or indicate that arthritis is affecting your big toe joint.  Both of these conditions are very common, but you should know that both can also become more problematic over time.  Click here to learn more about Bunions.

Q: My friend said that bunion surgery is really painful. Is this true?

A: Bunion surgery is not as painful as you may have heard.  Most of our patients only take pain medication for 1-3 days after bunion surgery, and almost all of them state that it wasn’t nearly as painful as they thought it would be.  Careful surgical technique can help to minimize postoperative pain, as does the protocol that we have our patients employ after their bunion surgery.  In addition, most patients with bunion surgery are able to bear weight on their surgical foot immediately after surgery.  More information can be found on our Bunion page.

Q: If I have a bunion, do I need a bunionectomy (surgery)?

A: Not necessarily.  The main consideration is whether your bunion (or bunions, as many people have them on both feet) is painful.  If it is, there are treatment options that can be employed before surgery is considered.  For those people who continue to have pain after conservative (or non-surgical) treatment options have been attempted, then bunion surgery or a bunionectomy may be performed.  A bunionectomy is considered elective surgery, which means that a patient can elect/decide to have the procedure if pain persists, but may also choose not to have the surgery performed.  For more information about bunions, visit our Bunion page on this website.

Q: How will I know if I need bunion surgery?

A: Bunion surgery is only to be considered if pain does not improve sufficiently with non-surgical or conservative care measures.

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Children's Feet (2)

Q: My child gets frequent ingrown toenails. What could be causing this?

A: Your child could be wearing shoes that are too small.  This happens quite often because children and teenagers can experience rapid growth and rarely measure the size of their feet.  For some children (and adults as well), there is extra flesh on the side of the nail, and/or they have a nail that is growing in a horseshoe shape, and it is therefore prone to developing an infection.

Q: Why does my child’s heel hurt?

Your child may be experiencing pain in the growth plate area of his or her heel.  This is called calcaneal apophysitis, and it is a common cause of heel pain in children, particularly those who participate in sports.  Calcaneal apophysitis often occurs in kids who are 8-14 years old, and common symptoms of this condition include pain in the back or bottom of the heel which is typically worse during or after sports.  Another name for this condition is Sever’s disease, but it is not really a “disease”, and it also responds very well to treatment.  See our main heel pain page for more information.

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Corns and Calluses (1)

Q: What causes pain in the ball of the foot?

A: There are many conditions that can cause pain in the ball of the foot.  These include capsulitis, metatarsalgia, stress fractures, hammertoes, neuromas, loss of fat padding that is supposed to be present in this area, calluses, fractures, or plantar warts.  In addition, people with a high arched foot often have more pressure on the ball of the foot which can lead to pain in this area, and this can also occur in people with feet that are too mobile, or who have with bones that are longer or shorter than the adjacent bones.

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Diabetic Foot Care (2)

Q: My husband is diabetic. How often should we check his feet?

A: Every day.  People with diabetes are often at increased risk for developing foot problems, and this is certainly true if they have poor circulation, nerve damage or neuropathy, or conditions such as corns/calluses, bunions, hammertoes, and other foot deformities.  We tell every patient with diabetes that he/she must carefully inspect his/her feet every single day.  This includes the top and bottom of the feet, and the areas between the toes.  It’s important to look for any open wounds or sores, cuts, blisters, redness, swelling, drainage, and warmth.  If any of these occur, it’s important to call us right away (586-298-1585), as these could indicate that an infection or ulceration has developed.  If not properly treated, foot/leg ulcers or infection could result in serious problems such as amputation, which can often be prevented with early diagnosis and treatment.

Q: What type of shoes should I wear?

A:  This depends on many factors, some of which I have outlined here – What you need to know about shoes and foot health.

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Foot Fractures (4)

Q: Is it true that toe fractures are no big deal, and that you don’t do anything for them?

A: NO.  It’s important to have your fracture evaluated, because sometimes the break causes the bone(s) to shift or move out of place, and this could cause the fracture to heal in a misaligned way, or cause it not to heal at all (which can lead to prolonged pain, swelling, etc.)  Most fractures remain in adequate alignment, but if not, they may be need to be realigned (typically in the office.)  We also place people in a surgical shoe to help allow the fracture to heal properly.  Even if the trauma did not result in a fracture, this special shoe can help to immobilize the area after your injury.

Q: Is it true that I can’t have a broken bone because I can still walk on my foot?

A: No.  Just because you can walk after an injury, this does not mean that you can’t have a fracture/broken bone.  There are 26 bones in each foot, and you actually CAN have a broken bone/fracture and still be able to walk.  Walking on a broken bone can lead to problems, including worsening of the fracture and/or non-healing.  Foot fractures need some type of immobilization (and sometimes even surgery if poorly aligned) in order to heal properly.

Q: What causes pain in the ball of the foot?

A: There are many conditions that can cause pain in the ball of the foot.  These include capsulitis, metatarsalgia, stress fractures, hammertoes, neuromas, loss of fat padding that is supposed to be present in this area, calluses, fractures, or plantar warts.  In addition, people with a high arched foot often have more pressure on the ball of the foot which can lead to pain in this area, and this can also occur in people with feet that are too mobile, or who have with bones that are longer or shorter than the adjacent bones.

Q: What is a stress fracture?

A: Stress fractures are a type of fracture that can occur in the lower limbs from sports or repetitive force to the area. There a number of factors that make people more likely to suffer a stress fracture, including osteoporosis, flat feet, running long distances and having high, rigid arches.  You can help prevent stress fractures by modifying your running equipment and running regimen.  Stress fractures require immobilization, so it’s important to have any persistent pain evaluated so that treatment can be instituted that will allow for proper healing to occur. 

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Foot Surgery (7)

Q: I’ve heard that foot surgery is really painful. Is this true?

A: Foot surgery is not as painful as you may have heard.  Most of our patients only take pain medication for 1-3 days after surgery, and nearly all of them state that it was not nearly as painful as they expected.   Careful surgical technique can help to minimize postoperative pain, as does the protocol that we have our patients employ following their surgery.

Q: Does foot surgery require being put to sleep?

A: Usually not.  The majority of foot surgery (such as for bunion, hammertoes, great toe arthritis, neuroma, and tailor’s bunion surgery to name a few) is performed under what is called monitored anesthesia care with local sedation.  This means that the anesthesiologist provides medication through an IV that makes you sleepy, and we inject numbing medication into the area of your foot where the procedure will be performed.  So you are breathing on your own, do not have a tube down your throat, and are not “put under” or “put to sleep” as you may have heard is performed for some surgeries.  In addition, the vast majority of foot surgery is performed at outpatient surgical centers or hospitals, and patients go home just a few hours after their surgery.

Q: What is a podiatrist?

A: A podiatrist is a doctor who specializes in foot and ankle care.  Most have had 11 years of education and training after high school, which is comprised of the following: after completing undergraduate college, we then attend 4 years of podiatric medical school, after which we receive a doctor of podiatric medicine (DPM) degree.  Following this, we enter what is called residency training.  Podiatric medicine and surgery residency programs typically consist of 3 years of hospital training and include rotations in the various medical specialties (such as internal medicine, emergency room medicine, anesthesiology, rheumatology, general surgery, radiology, psychology, infectious disease, etc.) with the majority of time spent in rotations focused on the medical and surgical treatment of foot and ankle problems.  In Michigan, podiatrists may perform surgery on any part of the foot and ankle.  In addition, as lower extremity specialists, we may be the first to diagnose a wide variety of medical conditions, including gout, vascular/circulation problems (which may include peripheral arterial disease or PAD), nerve problems/peripheral neuropathy, and blood clots/deep vein thrombosis (or DVT.)

Q: If I have a bunion, do I need a bunionectomy (surgery)?

A: Not necessarily.  The main consideration is whether your bunion (or bunions, as many people have them on both feet) is painful.  If it is, there are treatment options that can be employed before surgery is considered.  For those people who continue to have pain after conservative (or non-surgical) treatment options have been attempted, then bunion surgery or a bunionectomy may be performed.  A bunionectomy is considered elective surgery, which means that a patient can elect/decide to have the procedure if pain persists, but may also choose not to have the surgery performed.  For more information about bunions, visit our Bunion page on this website.

Q: What problems do foot and ankle surgeons treat?

A: Foot and ankle surgeons provide comprehensive medical and surgical care for a wide spectrum of foot and ankle conditions including common to complex disorders and injuries that affect people of all ages. They are uniquely qualified to detect the early stages of diseases that exhibit warning signs in the lower extremities, such as diabetes, arthritis and cardiovascular disease, and they manage foot conditions which may pose an ongoing threat to a patient’s overall health.

Contact Dr. Stephanie Carollo – Foot and Ankle Surgeon serving Macomb County from Shelby Township, MI today – 586-298-1585.

Q: What is a foot and ankle surgeon?

A: A Foot and ankle surgeon is the surgical specialist of the podiatric profession. They provide complete medical and surgical care for a variety of conditions that affect people of every age.

Call 586-298-1585 to schedule an appointment with Dr. Stephanie Carollo, a foot and ankle specialist and surgeon serving Macomb and Oakland Counties out of Shelby Township, MI.

Q: How will I know if I need bunion surgery?

A: Bunion surgery is only to be considered if pain does not improve sufficiently with non-surgical or conservative care measures.

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Foot Ulcer or Wound (1)

Q: My husband is diabetic. How often should we check his feet?

A: Every day.  People with diabetes are often at increased risk for developing foot problems, and this is certainly true if they have poor circulation, nerve damage or neuropathy, or conditions such as corns/calluses, bunions, hammertoes, and other foot deformities.  We tell every patient with diabetes that he/she must carefully inspect his/her feet every single day.  This includes the top and bottom of the feet, and the areas between the toes.  It’s important to look for any open wounds or sores, cuts, blisters, redness, swelling, drainage, and warmth.  If any of these occur, it’s important to call us right away (586-298-1585), as these could indicate that an infection or ulceration has developed.  If not properly treated, foot/leg ulcers or infection could result in serious problems such as amputation, which can often be prevented with early diagnosis and treatment.

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General Questions (8)

Q: What is a podiatrist?

A: A podiatrist is a doctor who specializes in foot and ankle care.  Most have had 11 years of education and training after high school, which is comprised of the following: after completing undergraduate college, we then attend 4 years of podiatric medical school, after which we receive a doctor of podiatric medicine (DPM) degree.  Following this, we enter what is called residency training.  Podiatric medicine and surgery residency programs typically consist of 3 years of hospital training and include rotations in the various medical specialties (such as internal medicine, emergency room medicine, anesthesiology, rheumatology, general surgery, radiology, psychology, infectious disease, etc.) with the majority of time spent in rotations focused on the medical and surgical treatment of foot and ankle problems.  In Michigan, podiatrists may perform surgery on any part of the foot and ankle.  In addition, as lower extremity specialists, we may be the first to diagnose a wide variety of medical conditions, including gout, vascular/circulation problems (which may include peripheral arterial disease or PAD), nerve problems/peripheral neuropathy, and blood clots/deep vein thrombosis (or DVT.)

Q: Why do my feet feel numb?

A: There are a number of reasons why your feet may feel numb.  You may have a condition called peripheral neuropathy, where the nerves in your feet are not functioning properly, and are therefore not giving your brain all of the information about your feet.  Neuropathy can have many different causes, including diabetes, vitamin deficiency, back problems, chemotherapy, autoimmune or inherited conditions, infection, excessive alcohol intake, and kidney, liver, or thyroid problems.  It is very important for anyone with numbness to carefully check his/her feet every day, as you might have a wound or other problem that you cannot feel because of the nerve problems.  Additionally, you should see a doctor to learn why the numbness is occurring, and the possible treatment options for your condition.  For more information about peripheral neuropathy, visit http://tenderfootandanklecare.com/neuropathy/

Q: What was Sarah Jessica Parker told about high heels?

A: She was told by her podiatrist that working 18 hours days for 10 years in high heels have caused a problem.  Sarah Jessica Parker states,”I went to a foot doctor and he said, ‘Your foot does things it shouldn’t be able to do. That bone there. … You’ve created that bone. It doesn’t belong there.’ The moral of the story is, the chickens are coming home to roost. It’s sad, because my feet took me all over the world, but eventually they were like, ‘You know what, we are really tired, can you just stop — and don’t put cheap shoes on us?” Her quote was posted on Wonderwall on Friday, March 8, 2013.

 

Q: What causes pain in the ball of the foot?

A: There are many conditions that can cause pain in the ball of the foot.  These include capsulitis, metatarsalgia, stress fractures, hammertoes, neuromas, loss of fat padding that is supposed to be present in this area, calluses, fractures, or plantar warts.  In addition, people with a high arched foot often have more pressure on the ball of the foot which can lead to pain in this area, and this can also occur in people with feet that are too mobile, or who have with bones that are longer or shorter than the adjacent bones.

Q: Do I need podiatric care?

A: Most people suffer from some kind of foot disorder – from athlete’s foot or ingrown nails to bunions, hammertoes or corns. Tight-fitting or high-heeled shoes are often the culprit, but heredity, poor foot care, injuries, or medical conditions can also cause problems. Whatever the state of your feet, your podiatrist can treat your problem to restore your comfort and ease of movement.

Problems in your feet can lead to pain in your hips, knees and lower back. Take a moment to read this list of conditions or problems. If you find you might be suffering from one or more of these items, a visit to your podiatrist may be just the help your feet need.

MEDICAL CONDITIONS

 

  • High blood sugar (diabetes)
  • Cold or hot feet (circulatory problems)
  • Joint pain and swelling (arthritis or gout)
  • Nail Problems
  • Painful ingrown nails
  • Thickened nails that are difficult to trim
  • A black-and-blue nail from an injury

 

BONE PROBLEMS

 

  • An unsightly bump (bunion) on the side of your foot by your big toe
  • Uncomfortably bent toes (hammertoes) that may rub on the tops of your shoes
  • A stiff joint in a toe
  • Pain in the bottom or back of your heel (possibly a heel spur)
  • A broken (fractured) bone in your foot

 

SKIN PROBLEMS

 

  • A wart on your foot
  • Thickened skin (callus or corn) between your toes or where your foot repeatedly rubs against your shoe
  • Discolored patches (fungal infection) on your foot or nail
  • Cracks, sores or ulcers on your foot

 

SOFT TISSUE PROBLEMS

 

  • Muscle pain or tendinitis
  • Pain on the bottom of your feet (plantar fasciitis)
  • A twisted or sprained ankle
  • Arch Problems
  • Painful, tired flatfeet
  • Painful high arches

 

Nerve Conditions

 

  • Sharp pain in your toes (neuroma)
  • Sharp pain, numbness, or burning sensation in your toes when you’re at rest (neuropathy)

 

Q: Is there a foot doctor near me?

A: Most likely there is a foot doctor near you.  Many areas have foot and ankle specialists (doctors) called Podiatrists.  They are typically located in private practices and accept medical insurance, referrals from primary doctors and also see patients for urgent issues such as a broken foot or ankle.

Q: What areas in Macomb County and Oakland County does Dr. Carollo service?

A: Dr. Carollo’s office is located in Shelby Township, MI.  She services Macomb County and Oakland County residents in many townships and cities.  Some of these include Clinton Township, Shelby Township, Utica, Sterling Heights, Macomb Township, Troy, Rochester, Rochester Hills, Auburn Hills, Washington Township, Romeo and the surrounding areas.

Dr. Carollo is a top podiatrist (foot and ankle doctor/specialist) with years of experience and training from residency at the prestigious Cleveland Clinic Foundation.  Her methods and treatments contain the latest effective techniques so you can be back to normal in a shorter period of time.

Q: What type of shoes should I wear?

A:  This depends on many factors, some of which I have outlined here – What you need to know about shoes and foot health.

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Heel Pain (5)

Q: If I have a heel spur, do I need surgery?

A: No.  A heel spur sometimes occurs with a condition called plantar fasciitis, but we know from the research that it is actually NOT the spur that is causing the pain.  The spur results from the plantar fascia structure pulling on the heel bone over time, but is sometimes even seen on the x-rays of people who have never had heel pain at any point in their life.  Similarly, people can have heel pain but not actually have a heel spur.  Treatment for heel pain is directed at the cause, which is commonly but not always plantar fasciitis.  The overwhelming majority of people with plantar fasciitis have a total resolution of their pain without any invasive procedure or surgery, as there are many excellent treatment options available for this condition.

Q: Why does my heel hurt when I get out of bed?

A: You may have plantar fasciitis, a condition caused by overuse or strain of the plantar fascia, which is a structure that starts at the heel bone and runs across the bottom of your foot.  The plantar fascia relaxes when you’re in bed or off of your feet, and can be stretched or pulled when you begin walking.  For more information, visit our page on heel pain.

Q: Why does the back of my heel hurt?

A: You may have Achilles tendonitis, which an inflammation or irritation of the Achilles tendon, which is located in the back of your lower leg, and which attaches to the back of your heel bone which can cause your heel to hurt.  People with this condition often have tight calf muscles.  Some people with pain in the back of the heel can have a heel spur, or bone spur at the back of the heel bone.  For more information about Achilles tendonitis.  Also visit our heel pain page for more information.

Q: Why does my child’s heel hurt?

Your child may be experiencing pain in the growth plate area of his or her heel.  This is called calcaneal apophysitis, and it is a common cause of heel pain in children, particularly those who participate in sports.  Calcaneal apophysitis often occurs in kids who are 8-14 years old, and common symptoms of this condition include pain in the back or bottom of the heel which is typically worse during or after sports.  Another name for this condition is Sever’s disease, but it is not really a “disease”, and it also responds very well to treatment.  See our main heel pain page for more information.

Q: What type of shoes should I wear?

A:  This depends on many factors, some of which I have outlined here – What you need to know about shoes and foot health.

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Ingrown Toenails (2)

Q: My child gets frequent ingrown toenails. What could be causing this?

A: Your child could be wearing shoes that are too small.  This happens quite often because children and teenagers can experience rapid growth and rarely measure the size of their feet.  For some children (and adults as well), there is extra flesh on the side of the nail, and/or they have a nail that is growing in a horseshoe shape, and it is therefore prone to developing an infection.

Q: What type of shoes should I wear?

A:  This depends on many factors, some of which I have outlined here – What you need to know about shoes and foot health.

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Neuroma/Morton's Neuroma (2)

Q: What causes pain in the ball of the foot?

A: There are many conditions that can cause pain in the ball of the foot.  These include capsulitis, metatarsalgia, stress fractures, hammertoes, neuromas, loss of fat padding that is supposed to be present in this area, calluses, fractures, or plantar warts.  In addition, people with a high arched foot often have more pressure on the ball of the foot which can lead to pain in this area, and this can also occur in people with feet that are too mobile, or who have with bones that are longer or shorter than the adjacent bones.

Q: What type of shoes should I wear?

A:  This depends on many factors, some of which I have outlined here – What you need to know about shoes and foot health.

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Orthotics (2)

Q: What are orthotics?

A: Orthotics are devices that are placed inside your shoes, in order to help realign your foot and allow it to function in the most optimal way possible.  They are used to treat many painful foot conditions.  Orthotics help to redistribute the pressure that is placed on the bottom of your foot, and help to improve the faulty foot mechanics that can lead to things like arthritis and bunion and hammertoe deformities.  Think of orthotics as doing for your feet
what your eyeglasses do for your eyes–allow them to function in the best possible manner.  You can view the video on our “flat feet” page to learn more about orthotics.

Q: Will orthotics fit in all of my shoes?

A: We can make orthotics to fit in any style of shoe for those who wish to wear them all the time.  Most men’s dress shoes can accommodate custom orthotics easily.  Some women’s dress shoes, particularly narrow ones, may require that the orthotics be made thinner to fit in them.  Alternatively, we can make one pair for tennis shoes and other more casual shoes, and a second pair for some women’s dress shoes if needed.

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Our Office (1)

Q: How do I contact the office?

A: Please call 586-298-1585 to schedule an appointment or speak with our staff.
Also, please visit our contact us page to fill out our contact form.

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Peripheral Neuropathy (1)

Q: Why do my feet feel numb?

A: There are a number of reasons why your feet may feel numb.  You may have a condition called peripheral neuropathy, where the nerves in your feet are not functioning properly, and are therefore not giving your brain all of the information about your feet.  Neuropathy can have many different causes, including diabetes, vitamin deficiency, back problems, chemotherapy, autoimmune or inherited conditions, infection, excessive alcohol intake, and kidney, liver, or thyroid problems.  It is very important for anyone with numbness to carefully check his/her feet every day, as you might have a wound or other problem that you cannot feel because of the nerve problems.  Additionally, you should see a doctor to learn why the numbness is occurring, and the possible treatment options for your condition.  For more information about peripheral neuropathy, visit http://tenderfootandanklecare.com/neuropathy/

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Plantar Warts (2)

Q: I think I have a wart on my foot. Will an OTC product from the drugstore work?

A: It may or may not.  Sometimes these can be successful and cause the wart to resolve, but many times the medication in the OTC products is not strong enough to kill the wart.  This is often the case with warts on the bottom of the foot (or “plantar warts”), where the skin is thicker and OTC medications often don’t penetrate enough to work well.  However, some lesions may look like warts but are actually not, and it’s never a good idea to treat something unless you know what it is for sure.  Also, some people are poor candidates for OTC self-treatment, such as some diabetics and those with poor circulation or other conditions that put them at higher risk for foot problems.

Q: What causes pain in the ball of the foot?

A: There are many conditions that can cause pain in the ball of the foot.  These include capsulitis, metatarsalgia, stress fractures, hammertoes, neuromas, loss of fat padding that is supposed to be present in this area, calluses, fractures, or plantar warts.  In addition, people with a high arched foot often have more pressure on the ball of the foot which can lead to pain in this area, and this can also occur in people with feet that are too mobile, or who have with bones that are longer or shorter than the adjacent bones.

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Shoes (1)

Q: What type of shoes should I wear?

A:  This depends on many factors, some of which I have outlined here – What you need to know about shoes and foot health.

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Skin conditions (1)

Q: Can you get skin cancer on your foot?

A: Yes!  Many people don’t realize that it’s possible to get skin cancer on your foot, but it certainly is possible.  This is one more reason to check your feet regularly.  If you notice a new skin lesion/mole or a change in the appearance of one that you had, please get it checked out.  This just may be life-saving!

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Sports Injuries (2)

Q: What is a stress fracture?

A: Stress fractures are a type of fracture that can occur in the lower limbs from sports or repetitive force to the area. There a number of factors that make people more likely to suffer a stress fracture, including osteoporosis, flat feet, running long distances and having high, rigid arches.  You can help prevent stress fractures by modifying your running equipment and running regimen.  Stress fractures require immobilization, so it’s important to have any persistent pain evaluated so that treatment can be instituted that will allow for proper healing to occur. 

Q: What type of shoes should I wear?

A:  This depends on many factors, some of which I have outlined here – What you need to know about shoes and foot health.

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Surgery (1)

Q: How will I know if I need bunion surgery?

A: Bunion surgery is only to be considered if pain does not improve sufficiently with non-surgical or conservative care measures.

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Wounds and Cuts (1)

Q: Should you wash a cut in lake water or seawater?

A: No.  Neither one is optimal, as there are specific bacteria that are found in fresh water and others that are found in seawater.  Bottled water is a better option, as is betadine which is an iodine-containing solution bought at the drugstore.  Betadine kills bacteria very well and is a great item to have in your first aid kit.  Those with an iodine allergy should not use betadine, however.  Cuts should also be kept covered to help prevent infection.  Applying a small amount of topical antibiotic ointment prior to the bandage helps keep cuts moist, which can also help with healing.

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